Tag Archives: First Amendment rights

Our Flag: Long May She Wave

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President-elect Donald J. Trump has made fools of the mainstream media once again, with his tweet about flag burners–how, in his opinion, they ought to receive some sort of punishment. Typically, the media, and the left, went berserk.

He’s so dumb! He doesn’t know it’s unconstitutional to ban flag burning! He’s a threat to our constitutional rights! A potential dictator! He doesn’t know flag burning was ruled protected speech by the Supreme Court!

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Free Speech Rights for Some, but Not All?

These are Americans exercising their right to free speech, according to progressives and the media:

Outrage In Missouri Town After Police Shooting Of 18-Yr-Old Man

The Ferguson and the St. Louis County police departments, the MO Highway Patrol, the MO governor, virtually all the authorities in MO, as well as Barack Obama and Eric Holder, went out of their way to call these mobs “peaceful protesters” and to school law enforcement officers to take care not to infringe upon the First Amendment rights of these “protesters.”

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The “Spiral of Silence”: Self-Censorship and Political Correctness

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Despite that it’s commonly believed that the Internet facilitates free speech, a new study indicates that on social media people tend to not speak out if they believe that their views are unpopular or if they perceive that they may be negatively criticized for expressing their heart-felt opinions. The authors explain that it’s long been known that people self-censor in face-to-face interactions:

A major insight into human behavior from pre-internet era studies of communication is the tendency of people not to speak up about policy issues in publicor among their family, friends, and work colleagueswhen they believe their own point of view is not widely shared. This tendency is called the spiral of silence.”

Some social media creators and supporters have hoped that social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter might produce different enough discussion venues that those with minority views might feel freer to express their opinions, thus broadening public discourse and adding new perspectives to everyday discussion of political issues.

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